Overall view of the exhibition at the National Art Glass Gallery

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Brenda Page, little miss and me

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To Have and to Hold: Powder printed glass panels of weddings in my family

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To Have and to Hold: Powder printed glass panels of weddings in my family

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Putting the lid on Reflection 1: Fragile Strength

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Overall image of Ghostflowers

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Detail of Ghostflowers

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Violetta Photo: David McArthur

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At The Still Point of the Turning World. Decals of shadows suspended in petrie dishes

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Powder printed glass collar

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Powder printed glass collar

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Powder printed glass collar

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Powder printed glass cuffs

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Contemplation and The Conversation. Photo: David McArthur

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Word of Honour Images of my Grandparents fused in glass. Presented with their wedding dinner set and letters

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Detail of Word of Honour

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Detail of Saccharine. A collection of cloying, soppy words and sayings

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Detail of Adagio Photos from my childhood combined with pianola rolls like the ones I used to play at my Grandparents

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Setting up the exhibition

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My lovely husband helping to tie fishing line

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Brenda and I discussing the layout of the exhibition

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All boxed up and ready to go

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Ghostflower panels in their molds after firing

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Detail of plaster mold for Ghostflowers

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Forget me not 
National Art Glass Gallery, Wagga Wagga 
(with Brenda Page)
2015

This exhibition presents a collection of glass time capsules incorporating family heirlooms and personal items to illustrate ways we remember and preserve the past. The body of work looks at ways that people hold onto memories through letters, mementos, clothing, photographs, botanical specimens and ephemera.

‘Forget Me Not’ draws heavily on a series of heirlooms that have been passed down through my own family – particularly my Grandmother and Great Grandmother. These works utilise items personal to me but aim to illustrate a wider, more universal truth.